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Christianity is not under attack

disagree with the premise that “Displays of Christian faith (are) under attack” from columnist Rob Sigler on Friday, Nov. 6.

Having seen some of the problems that arise from state sponsorship of religion in Europe, the wise framers of our Constitution were careful to insert the no establishment clause and to insist that there should be no religious test for elected office. These ideas are not anti-religion; on the contrary, religious freedom is guaranteed because no local, state or federal institution can impose a specific brand of religion upon its citizens.

Every Christian church or institution in this country can display religious symbols, manger scenes and words of wisdom without fear of sanctions from the state. Similarly, a synagogue can display a star of David and a mosque can celebrate the devotion of its followers with a star and crescent.

As long as our country remains free and true to the principles established in our Constitution, Christians should have no fear of ever being restricted in their expressions of faith. However, just because Christianity happens to be the majority religion in this country does not mean that Christianity should be seen in any way to be sponsored by a government institution. Look at it this way: suppose, for the sake of argument, members of a minority religion were elected to positions of power and decided to display a large symbol of their religion in front of the courthouse on their special day. Many Christians would be dismayed at such a display on property we, as citizens, all own.

There is not now, and never will be, any restriction on prayer, no matter where you are: some prefer church, some say grace silently before a meal, even in a public place, but at a state-funded institution or ball game, any prayer should be personal and private, not public; therefore, such prayers may be Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist or whatever.

Christianity is not under attack. As citizens of this great country, we just have to be careful that no government, whether local, regional or national can be seen as approving of, or sponsoring a single religion; for, in this country, all religions are free and deserving of the respect of the majority. After all, it’s the Christian thing to do.

Jeff Justis

Oxford