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What time does the Total Solar Eclipse 2017 start? TV channels, live stream online, path (August 21)

The big event is nearing — the Total Solar Eclipse 2017.

Are you ready for a blackout, America?

Not everybody in the U.S. will get to see the full eclipse. Some will get about 90 percent.

Expect four hours of pageantry, from the time the sun begins to be eclipsed by the moon near Lincoln City, Oregon, until the time the moon’s shadow vanishes near Charleston, South Carolina. NASA will emcee the whole show, via TV and internet from that coastal city.

The total eclipse will last just 1 1/2 hours as the lunar shadow sweeps coast to coast at more than 1,500 mph (2,400 kph) starting at about 1:15 p.m. EDT and ending at 2:49 p.m. EDT. The sun’s crown — the normally invisible outer atmosphere known as the corona — will shine forth like a halo.

Here is a total solar eclipse 2017 map so you can see exactly where to watch it and follow the path.

For those not in the 14 states comprising the eclipse’s “path of totality,” here’s a look at some of the viewing opportunities online for live streaming and on TV:

— “Eclipse of the Century “: In partnership with Volvo, CNN plans two hours of livestreaming, 360-degree coverage accessible in virtual reality through Oculus and other VR headsets beginning at 1 p.m. EDT. Accompanying television coverage will include reporting from Oregon, Missouri, Tennessee and South Carolina.

— “Eclipse Over America “: The PBS science series NOVA is planning a quick turnaround on its eclipse documentary premiering Monday. Senior executive producer Paula S. Apsell said “Eclipse Over America,” which delves into why eclipses occur and what scientists can learn from them, will incorporate images of the event from across the country shot earlier that day with Dantowitz’s high-tech cameras.

— “Great American Eclipse “: The Science Channel will broadcast its live coverage from Madras, Oregon, from noon to 4 p.m. EDT, with commentary from educators and astronomers from the Lowell Observatory.

— “The Great American Eclipse “: David Muir will anchor ABC’s two hours of live coverage, with correspondents reporting from viewing parties across the country. NBC also plans live coverage, with Lester Holt hosting special reports at 1 and 2 p.m. EDT featuring correspondents reporting from Oregon, Illinois, Wyoming and South Carolina. Shepard Smith will break into typical broadcasting on Fox News Channel from noon to 4 p.m. EDT to update viewers on the eclipse and introduce footage from NASA and observatories around the country.

— “Solar Eclipse: Through the Eyes of NASA “: NASA will offer hours of coverage online and on NASA Television beginning at noon Eastern. It plans livestreaming of the eclipse beginning at 1 p.m. EDT with images from satellites, research aircraft, high-altitude balloons and specially modified telescopes.

— “The Total Solar Eclipse”: The Weather Channel is kicking off its live coverage at 6 a.m. EDT and continuing throughout the day with dispatches from seven locations along the “path of totality.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.