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Avoiding apathy between elections

In a Nov. 5 report from Politico, an estimated 36 million people cast their ballots ahead of Election Day.
That number is certainly stunning when considering that fewer than 82 million total voted in 2014 during the last midterm election.
The high turnout speaks to the climate of politics in the United States, and the way in which both sides of the political aisle have responded to various issues since Donald Trump was elected president in 2016.
Whether voters classify themselves as Republican, Democrat or Independent, everyone has an opinion on what President Trump’s policies are or aren’t doing for the United States and, likewise, most are actively engaged and invested in what the future holds.
Regardless of the midterm results being to each individual’s personal taste, a hearty round of applause has to be given to Americans simply taking charge and letting their voices be heard in massive numbers.
It’s easy – terrifyingly so – to be apathetic about local, state and federal elections. In a country of 326 million people, the voice and the vote of one person might seem irrelevant, but when several million shrug their shoulders and don’t head to the polls, the impact of indifference can have vast repercussions.
The foundation of America was built on everyone using their voice in bring change, and far too often in this country we take democracy – and the right to vote that comes with it – for granted.
It is imperative that we, as a country, always remember the importance and the sacrifices made for all of us to have these rights.
But it goes so far beyond the voting booth, it will be two more years before the United States has another major election. We would encourage everyone to stay involved and interested in what is happening on the federal level, and to keep an ear to the ground in the months between elections.
Remember what candidates do and don’t do, hold them accountable for their action or inaction and always remember that we all have the power to change the country.