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Ole Miss’ yearbook team becomes interactive

Yearbooks are generally made to revisit the past, but now Ole Miss’ yearbook team is looking to make their latest project futuristic.

For their 2017 edition, the Ole Miss yearbook will feature augmented reality technology to make certain pictures come alive.

Ole Miss senior and editor-in-chief of the yearbook, Cady Herring, believes the future of journalism and storytelling “needs to be interactive.”

“I wanted to do something with the yearbook that would bring it into the 21st century and hasn’t been done before,” she said. “When I saw that Ole Miss Athletics started using virtual reality with their posters on campus, I thought it would be just as easy to do with the yearbook and would be a great way to expand the number of stories into multimedia pieces that could be linked to our website.”

With this particular project, an app called Aurasma is downloaded to a phone which allows users to scan hidden codes above pictures in the yearbook. Once the images are triggered, a video will begin on the user’s phone.

Herring noted that some students have likened the technology to something out of Harry Potter.

Avery Gore, the multimedia editor who was in charge of the AR in the yearbook, says about 18 to 20 photos use the technology in the project.

“It was pretty easy to do,” she said. “It’s pretty basic, but when you see it in person, it sort of looks like magic. It’s going to become something really big in the future.”